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I have been back in the UK now for a week after my long stay in Cyprus, February until Late July, it has been a bit of a shock climate wise as the temperature is virtually half it was in Cyprus when I left and it feels like Autumn if not quite Winter. At 39 degrees centigrade in Cyprus when I left it was uncomfortable for me but now back in the UK I feel like getting my boots and scarf out and turning the heating on at 17 degrees…in July? and it’s raining!

There has been a fairly long gap between posts here as I did not have the time to write the last few weeks before I left and since I have been back my priority was catching up. I now have a bit of a backlog of topics to blog about but that is good as it will keep me from focusing on the weather hopefully.

Before I left I was invited to the theatre, I am a theatre fan and in the UK live near the Chichester Festival Theatre, in fact when I returned I was invited to accompany some friends to see Mack and Mabel there which made a very nice homecoming. The theatre excursion in Cyprus was very different as firstly it was outside and secondly the play was performed in an ancient amphitheater The Odeon at Paphos, and no it’s nothing like the one on the High Street. The only similarity to Chichester Festival Theatre is the seating design as  it too has an apron stage with seating rising on five sides. Arriving in Paphos, the backdrop was pretty spectacular as the sky was alight with a glorious sunset of purples and pinks with the silhouette of the lighthouse in front. We crossed the open  stage covered in loo paper and with a toilet placed centrally on the stage, to reach our seats which were the stone steps,I had duly taken a cushion.

Every year for the past eighteen years in July the Festival of Ancient Greek Drama takes place and performances are given at three venues Curium, The Odeon and a new amphitheatre in Lefkosia, The Skali, We went to see a play called Peace by Aristophanes and performed by the  Cypriot company Yiolanta Christodoulou Theatre Group. Presented in contemporary dress with subtitles displayed on a screen above the stage, this play is a comedy that had much that was visually funny even if you couldn’t follow the fast dialogue. In true theatrical tradition some male parts were played by women and the female parts by men .Lea Maleni ,who played the lead role of Trygaeus was superb, conveying with her body language the portrait of a man even though she was a small framed woman. She very much resembled Charlie Chaplin with a small moustache attached to her upper lip. Many years ago I remember seeing Macbeth performed by an English company at Curium, a fantastic experience as the setting is so atmospheric. If you get the chance do try and see at least one production as even today these ancient plays resonate with present day situations.

In a different setting but with the same gorgeous sunset as backdrop, I visited The Anassa hotel at Latchi on my last evening in Cyprus. There was much controversy when the hotel was first built as the owners managed to get permission to build on the precious Akamas, the wilderness that is supposed to be protected from development. I went with a friend to enjoy the music of a young Greek pianist  Vaya Nassi who accompanies a Greek singer Anthi. The setting was truly spectacular as the sun set lazily behind the hills in Polis bay, the sky turning from the soft mauve and peach to a fiery red as it sank into the sea, We also had the privilege of watching a sliver of moon aligned with Venus and Jupiter as that too sank behind the hills. We lounged on the sofas and chairs on the terrace enjoying our cocktails and the great musical accompaniment to the show that nature provided.

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Music Museums and Motivation

This week I managed to get to see some live music at last as I have been missing seeing any live performances since I’ve been here. In Paphos at the Technopolis 20 culture centre they have a full programme of events for June with some classical recitals as well as Jazz, the performance I went to see on Thursday evening however was rembetika the Greek blues. A group of musicians playing bass, bouzouki, guitar and fiddle entertained us for more than two hours in the garden under the stars, with a collection of nostalgic music. Many of the songs were well known to the audience who sang along and on occasions got up to dance. Some songs have a very compelling rhythm and you can’t help but want to get up and strut your stuff, I did manage to resist however as the fear of making a fool of myself was stronger than the compelling music. In true Greek style drinks and nibbles were available and the audience were seated at tables café style, often chatting throughout the performance some more loudly than others!

Unlike Sunday when I attended a Charity Garden Party arranged by Janet Robinson of Nitbats in her very own garden around the pool which had live music throughout the afternoon. Performed by a mixture of singers in different styles from rock to blues to pop this time I couldn’t resist, this was another kind of nostalgia as I was transported back to the seventies with the same footwork to match!! Janet was raising funds for a local Hospice for cancer patients as well as a cancer charity and did a terrific job organising a very entertaining event, as well as the music there was a fashion show, a raffle and several stalls selling this and that including me of course tucked away under the arch near the loos with my books. Elena of Orexi brought along some of her delicious food for sale which went in a flash and there was of course a bar. A very jolly time was had by all and so far she has managed to raise a goodly sum of 1300 euros.

I took advantage of my time over Paphos way as I stayed overnight with a friend and went to visit the church and Folk museum at Yerroskipou on Friday. I have just finished reading a book called ‘A Walk with Aphrodite written by Peter Breakwell describing a mammoth walk around the thirty seven villages of Paphos over very rough terrain, with the aim of raising money to buy a vital piece of equipment for the hospital in Paphos. He undertook this walk in the 1990’s and there have been many changes since that time but he records the churches he visited and historical landmarks nearby which made it a very interesting read as well as his encounters with the various Muktars and generous offers of a bed for the night. One of the churches he visited was the old church Ayia Paraskevi in Yerroskipou centre which has five domes. I didn’t remember ever having been inside although I probably have but took the opportunity to have another peep. Inside there are a few remains of some of the painted frescoes that once covered all the walls, evidence that they had been either plastered or painted over at some stage as there were signs of heavy chisel marks where the covering plaster had been removed. No photographs were allowed unfortunately and there was rather grumpy looking priest on guard so I couldn’t even sneak one in.

I had long wanted to visit the museum and was not disappointed. A very large house and a nice example of its kind. It was evident from the abundance of rooms and layout as well as architectural refinements that this was the house of a wealthy man. The British consul lived here from 1800 to 1864. The best part was a room where there were some very fine textile examples including a very lovely piece of Fythkiotika and a beautifully unusual runner which looked like chenille work, with vibrant colours. To top it all off I was invited to watch a short video on how olive oil was made using the huge hand press that was in an outbuilding.Very interesting and as I spoke to the attendant  in Greek when I first entered and established after enquiry that my Dad was from Cyprus I didn’t have to pay, bonus.

Saturday morning saw me take part in yet another different past time, helping a volunteer group  ACT to pick up rubbish on the beaches of the Akamas. Keith Watkins along with his wife Wendy, have so far organised 16 clean up excursions to the beaches of the Akamas over a few years, they occur every couple of months. The members number around 60 altogether. My friends took me in their truck, the roads being mostly unmade and often badly rutted so the journey itself is quite an adventure. Sitting in the back was reminiscent of a roller coaster ride, the scenery though is splendid with views of a rugged coastline. It is along this coast on one particular beach at Lara bay where the turtles come to lay their eggs every year and although it is supposed to be protected you still get ignorant people setting up their umbrellas and picnicking on these sensitive spots.

Keith organises these excursions with military precision, doing a recky beforehand taking many photos of the rubbish strewn about either by careless visitors or washed up from the sea. He divides the area into sections so that they work along the coast leaving each beach pristine…. until the next time. I was astounded at the amount of rubbish, between us, there were about 10 or 12 of us, we collected 65 large garden refuse bags as well as a large haul of larger items of plastic pipe, wire and large containers and cans. These are all deposited in one spot and the Forestry commission informed, always enormously grateful who then come along and dispose of it. I could have filled one sack alone with shoes of all kinds, flip-flops, sandals trainers all sizes, I even found a back pack half buried in the sand. The coast line has a lot of low-lying bushes and debris gets tangled in the branches and caught underneath, the road to the beach was particularly bad with bottles of glass as well as plastic. On the shore there were large piles where the rubbish washed in from the sea had all tangled together with seaweed, in these there were hundreds of bottle tops and disposable lighters, in one of the gullies I found a whole carton of cigarettes saturated with sea water, apparently this is a common sight, it is suspected it could be contraband discarded before the coastguard catches them.

Keith should be given a medal for his initiative and effort as he is at least saving some of this plastic from degrading even further and getting eaten by the fish as well as keeping the coastline clean. I would nominate him myself if there was such an award available in Cyprus. After a few hours we all sit down and enjoy a snack often provided by Wendy washed down with a beer supplied by Keith although each person brought their own, except me. It was a great way of seeing a part of the coast I otherwise don’t have access to and doing something worthwhile in the process.

I hope I will have the opportunity to participate again on another trip.

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Life’s Ups and Downs

There has been a bit of a lull in my blog posts as last week I had an unfortunate accident that has left me in a state of musing and shaken but nothing is broken except the car. Being without a car temporarily is rather relaxing and I have discovered the joys of getting around on foot and by bus. There is a bus stop very close which has a small minibus that runs between Polis, the nearest town about 5 minutes away, and Latchi which is further down the road. It runs every hour so very like my home village in the UK. It is possible to get around the island between the main towns by bus now, as the government in an attempt to get the Cypriots from behind the wheels of their beloved cars, set up a public transport network much needed on the island, there are no railways. It is mostly used by foreigners ‘though as even in Nicosia my relatives prefer to use their cars, most Cypriots find it strange if you want to walk anywhere rather than going by car. The buses are also very cheap compared to my local buses in the UK  as to go from Polis to Paphos a 40 minute journey it cost 5 euros. I have local shops close by where I can get most things and one is even in reasonable walking distance. In thirty minutes I can also walk to a very nice beach with facilities of a cafe and showers on a lovely quiet road through the fields with plenty of interesting things to look at on the way. In fact it is one of the nicest beaches in the area as it is  sandy. Of course as everyone else has a car I have had plenty of kind offers of lifts and assistance in shopping etc but I am by nature an independent person I always like to find out what I can do for myself.

I took the bus into Polis on Saturday and walked to the supermarket and while walking around town. I passed the museum a rather pleasant looking building which I had never visited and always wanted too so this was my opportunity. Needless to say there was no one else there, it was small but well presented and there were some interesting pottery pieces. There was no restriction on photographs so I snapped away happily. The best exhibit for me was a massive pottery figure that was found close by to Polis. It had been made in sections the torso parts being thrown on a potter’s wheel which then slotted together. It had a very contemporary look to me the way it had been exhibited like some modern installation piece. I find that these ancient pieces can be very inspirational especially the pottery designs and decoration. I read a very interesting article recently by a fellow blogger on WordPress  Anna Reeve who is a student of classics, a resident in Leeds who is very interested in ancient Cypriot pottery. She had just received a copy of an article published by the National Museum of Denmark which she had been wanting to read for some time which compares some of the ceramic work of artists such as Picasso with ancient Cypriot pottery pieces. It turns out Picasso worked with a fellow artist for a period Suzanne Ramíé and she derived a great deal of inspiration from Ancient Cypriot ceramics , some of her pieces echo the shapes of specific pieces exactly. Here is the article well worth a read.  

The Avakas Gorge

Yesterday I went with a friend to visit the Avakas Gorge on the Akamas. It is a spectacular place to visit with huge pock marked  rock formations on your approach to the gorge and beautiful panoramic views  of cultivated land with a variety of trees in various shades of grey green and greens and the beach behind you. The approach is gentle enough once you get near the trail and very shady so extremely pleasant when the sun is fierce. As you go further along the rocks get higher and higher on either side reaching as high as 30 meters and start to close in over the top. The  pathway runs alongside and sometimes requires crossing the river bed which in the high summer is often dry but this time of year has water and the stones get slippery. As you travel along the river bed the boulders get larger  and more difficult to navigate as you get nearer the exit it is more challenging. This limestone gorge was hewn by a torrent of water over aeons but the water that runs through it now is barely a trickle although about a foot deep in places. There was maiden hair fern growing from the rock face and many large lizards scurrying past as we approached. This area is said to hold  a multitude of flora and fauna and a particularly rare specimen called the Centauria Akamandis with purple flowers, sadly we didn’t notice any as we were too busy chatting.There are several benches dotted along the way to sit and take in the atmosphere. If you are visiting in the summer it would be advisable to go early in the day as the approach is very open and dusty and when the sun is high it is relentless. High up on top of the cliff top sits a cafe called The Last Castle that does spit roasted kebabs over charcoal  either lamb or chicken. You have to book in high season as it is so popular and has marvellous views from its high spot, over the sea. You can sit under a shady vine on stone seats and sip a cool beer while admiring the view after your arduous adventure. We went back along the road to The Searays cafe to have a drink and relax while admiring the view.

The Crafty Side of Life

I am lucky enough to know some very talented people here in Cyprus, Elena Savvides – Doghman and her husband Bassam Doghman to name but two. Elena is a the daughter of a Cypriot father from Droushia and a Finnish mother. Born in the UK she studied at Goldsmiths then at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies UCL doing a Master’s in Russian and European Culture. Her family came to Cyprus on their holidays but she was not interested in living here then and yet here she is married to Bassam who is Lebanese and they have three beautiful children. She is a woman of many talents and worked latterly  in an Italian restaurant in London where she honed her not inconsiderable talent for cooking and managing to cater for large groups of people. She has since put those skills to great use and has added to her enormous repertoire of culinary skills which she shares with a wide group of diners on her supper club evenings.These are themed and can feature Italian, Finnish, Lebanese or Greek cooking or anything else she that takes her fancy. Last week she cooked a fabulous array of Finnish dishes for a select group of diners, the dishes included, a herring dip,a very tasty raw beetroot and horseradish salad, egg butter and rye bread, stuffed cabbage leaves covered in cheese, wild Finnish mushrooms, a mashed swede dish, mashed potato with a wonderfully rich venison casserole, to round it off we had a bilberry tart made with wild bilberries picked by Bassam in Finland. In the warmer months the suppers are held in the garden and can include many more people. Elena caters for many events and also makes a wide variety of preserves and pickles which she sells along with many tasty savoury morsels  at the monthly farmer’s market in the Herb Garden at Akourdalia,

Bassam is also multi-talented and can turn his hand to most things, he is known for his stone and woodwork. From a large array of olive wood in his store he carves platters and plaques which make beautiful additions to any home or restaurant.  At the moment he is working on making a large door for a renovated mosque in Kato Arodhes. 

My cousin Nicos is another multi talented man and also can turn his hand to most things. He has created a beautiful garden in his home in Goudi with a lot of stonework surrounding the garden, the paths are decorated with mosaic work. In his spare time he sculpts stone figures.He is hoping to hold an exhibition soon.

Just down the road also in Goudi Kate Fensom lives and works. An artist of only a few years she has developed her own unique style since living in Cyprus, painting magical images full of symbolism and mysticism. She has many keen followers of her work and is at present holding an exhibition in Bellapais Abbey near Kyrenia. It is many years since I have visited Bellapais and I would love to see her work in this setting as the abbey and its surrounds hold their own special enchantment. She first came to stay in  Cyprus in the North as a friend of hers invited her for a holiday, she felt very at home there and has an affinity with the place. As she lives only down the road from my cousin I paid her a visit a few weeks ago and spent a very interesting couple of hours chatting. It is always fascinating to hear people’s journey of discovery of Cyprus and once discovered it seems to somehow to hook them and they want to stay.

Some  of the things that hook me are the wide open sky with clear light and the wild and wooly landscape. On Tuesday I went for a short excursion up on a different part of the Akamas just outside Inia following the road to Lara. I parked the car on the top road and walked about a mile or so of the Lara road on foot as it is only best navigated in a four wheel drive vehicle. The road is unmade and often has deep ruts where the rain runs off so it needs careful navigation. The wild flowers are at their best here right now and the wild irises and sweet peas are out in force, dotted with vetch and mustard mixed in with poppies and daisies and the occasional hyacinth. Although it looks wild up here it is in fact cultivated in patches and it looked like wheat was growing, the wind making it move like water, swirling around the lone carob tree. The day had turned cloudy but I could see over in the distance Lara beach where the turtles come to hatch every year. There was some interesting rocks up here and not being informed enough to tell you what sort I have taken photos instead. It looked like it might have some ore in it and when I first saw it, looked strangely like it was covered in seaweed but of course this is far from the sea, unless it is fossilised? I came across a very interesting video some time ago explaining the geology of the island as it is much studied by groups of geologists from all over the world. Also on my walk I came across a whole writhing bundle of caterpillars in the road where did they come from and what will they be? Later on looking more closely at a photo I took, I saw a huge one of the same variety making its way through the flowers.There is always something to marvel at.

Wild and Wonderful

It’s been a busy time since I last posted.  The weather has been gradually getting warmer, today it was 23 degrees in Paphos so several layers of clothing have been shed in the daytime and thinner layers are called for. Today being International Women’s Day there was an event my friend Elena of Orexi was catering for in a Anasa community Wellness centre in Paphos run by Annelie Roux. I went along to lend a hand and took some books just in case. There was a whole programme of taster sessions of about 20 minutes duration including self-defence and Chi Gong, It was a beautiful day.

I have been taking advantage of the lovely weather to get out and enjoy the glorious countryside that is around the area in which I am staying near the Akamas. Early in the week I met Elena to visit Koula at the goat farm and buy some fresh anari the delicious soft cheese made from goats milk that is very like ricotta. A favourite way of eating this is taking a slice and pouring some carob syrup over it. On the way we passed some almond blossom in full bloom and a field filled with mustard and dotted with poppies. This lush growth of Spring is exceptional this year as there has been an abundance of rain. I spent the lunchtime with a group of ladies that lunch at Droushia Heights hotel, perched high on the hill with magnificent views overlooking the sea,

On Thursday my cousin Androula came down from Treis Elies to walk the Aphrodite Trail and we set off at an easy pace stopping to admire the wild flowers, cyclamen were everywhere and as we climbed ever higher like the proverbial goats ,the panoramic scenery became more and more breath-taking and the orchids became larger, dotted about with yellow anemones, the smell of the gorse was heady. The combination of the exercise, scenery. and the fresh scented air was both invigorating and relaxing. We chose to climb up the steepest side and it seemed we would never reach the top, once the plateau was reached the scenery changed again with a lush covering on the ground and a different species of tree intermingled with the grey skeletons of dead bushes either ravaged by the harsh winter or just past their natural life span. Whereas the ascent was on a gravelly soil, the descent was on stoney ground, many in large slabs with almost natural steps  taking you down in a gentler slope. Areas where many travellers had passed were dotted with their creations of stones stacked in natural sculptures. We passed the goats feasting on the fresh lush vegetation, hearing the tinkling of their bells before coming into view looking very sleek and proud. This walk takes about three hours if you are sturdy walkers but as we stopped for various breaks and admired the scenery we took nearer four hours. It is one of the many trails you can take in this area some less strenuous and shorter, some longer.

On the Friday I did another foray into the wild, this time more of an amble along the country roads of Droushia with Elena’s foraging group. I had been looking forward to this for a long time. Elena supplied a very tasty breakfast before we set off in search of wild food to cook for lunch. The most prized food being wild asparagus which we found very difficult to find as the harsh weather had sadly brought this delicate vegetable to an early end but some of the group were successful in claiming the odd shoot. We gathered the succulent centres of wild artichoke, mallow leaves, mustard flowers, nettles, vetch and wild pea shoots along with a few other wild leaves. These Elena turned into a wonderful risotto with gorgonzola cheese and garlic, the mallow leaves were cooked with onion dressed with lemon and had a wonderful fresh flavour while the artichoke stalks were cooked with fresh louvi (a black eye bean that is a Cypriot favourite and eaten often) and dressed with oil and salt. The rare asparagus was cooked with scrambled egg. The mustard flowers and various shoots and leaves were made into a delicious salad. We sat in the garden under the mish mish tree and ate our flavoursome lunch washed down with a glass of chilled white wine. A truly relaxing and inspiring morning with good company.

Next week sees a complete contrast as I’m off to walk the mean streets of Nicosia.

 

I Missed It!

This weekend has been a holiday time in Cyprus. The Saturday and Sunday saw many carnivals taking place around the country the biggest being in Limassol. For various reasons I sadly missed this gaiety and a great photo opportunity if ever there was one. Instead I was enjoying a glorious day and a seafood lunch at Latchi, I even wore my sunglasses for the first time but from what I hear a good time was had by all…. even me. On the Monday generally all Cypriots gather with their families and celebrate Green (or Clean) Monday the beginning of Lent. This is marked by eating a meal based on vegetables, salad and shellfish or octopus. Often picnics are taken out to the countryside on the Monday and kites are flown. I was greatly looking forward to seeing this but sadly the weather was very wet and cold, unusually so for this time of year and most were staying indoors in the warm. I saw one brave sole trying to fly his kite in very poor conditions but bravo for the spirit of the thing..

Today I have been helping my good friend Elena of Orexi fame in her kitchen bottling up some of her delicious preserves in readiness for the monthly event of The Farmers market at the herb garden at Pano Akourdalia which should be very busy as it usually is and a great social gathering in a beautiful spot. On my way home from a productive morning I decided to travel a different route taking the long way round and went through Kato Arodhes an adjacent village to the one  in which I am staying in so doing I passed some amazing scenery looking down to the sea with lush green everywhere. I thought I’d share the pictures.

On the Wild Side

There are some beautiful wild flowers to be found growing in Cyprus, particularly up in the mountains of Troodos and on the Akamas peninsula. The best time to find them is after the rains in November or March and early April before the temperature starts to rise. There are a wide variety of wild orchids, cyclamen, ranunculus and wild poppies of course. It is quite a miracle to see, what looks like a scrubby landscape most of the year, turn into a carpet of gorgeous colour.

Most of these disappear after a short time. But there are some which dry on their stalks and provide us with a different kind of attractive wild flower.

These beautifully elegant spikes of flowers look very like an Asphodel, but is it? These can be found all over the island.

I love the sculptural beauty of these lovely specimens, they look like a spiky sunflower. But I have no idea what their name is.

Cultivated land will go from scrubby to green to golden to scrubby golden in the course of a year. But the most dramatic contrast appears on the hills after the intense heat of summer when the first cooling rains fall. It is amazing how quickly a flower will shoot up and burst into bloom with just a small amount of water. What was once a scrubby hillside becomes a wash of golden-yellow or a flush of red with a haze of poppies. Springtime will also see the wonder of the blossoming almond trees with their delicate white blossom looking just like a snowstorm on the hillside.

Springtime is certainly when you will see some spectacular scenery on this island. The weather may be a bit unsettled but the scenery will be very rewarding.

The Day of the Donkey

I love donkeys. They are a less daunting size than horses and can have beautiful faces. An uncomplaining worker, in Cyprus they were essential to farming the land especially in mountain villages as they are able to navigate the narrow tracks and  uncompromising fields.

The  long- eared Cypriot donkey is a handsome breed and is similar to the donkeys found in France and Spain and is thought to have been introduced to Cyprus originally by the Crusaders.

Today they are not such a common sight as they have been usurped by the 4 x 4 truck, not as pretty – well in my eyes anyway – and certainly noisier . There donkey population at its height was in the region of 50,000 now the number is fewer than 2,000 and a completely  new career now awaits them when their owners finally retire them from farming. There are a few donkey sanctuaries  and farms dotted about the island and a farm in Kalokedara has imaginatively come up with the idea of using them to ferry tourists to a nearby out of the way monastery Panayia Tou Sindhi. This unusual remote monastery has recently been beautifully restored,but is quite difficult to access by car as the roads leading to it are mostly unmade tracks. This I discovered for myself one very hot day when on the spur of the moment I decided to follow the signpost pointing to it. Let’s just say by the time I reached within trekking distance I was very dusty and tired and would have had to abandon the car on an overgrown track to get near it. I think the idea of doing this trip on a donkey a delightful prospect and I look forward to giving it a try next time I go. One place I would particularly like to see trekking excursions would be on the Akamas as this I feel would be far less damaging to the environment than the four wheeled safaris that now take place. And what about the Arvagas gorge another perfect excursion trip. I see a very useful future for donkeys.

The Akamas – Aphrodite’s garden

Yesterday late afternoon I made a trip to Aphrodite‘s Baths up on the edge of the Akamas. It has cooled down enough now a pleasant 26 -28 degrees and  in the late afternoon there was a pleasant breeze, a perfect time to make a pilgrimage to this beautiful spot.

Cyprus is the island of Aphrodite who, legend has it rose out of the sea foam at the rock that is called Petra tou Romiou found between Paphos and Limassol. On the edge of the wilderness that is the Akamas there is a cave with a crystal clear water pool that is said to be where she bathed. Taking the road from Latchi you wind a round the coastal road with ever-changing views of the coast on your right until you come to the very edge of the Akamas.

It is some years since I have visited and the area has recently been landscaped in a very attractive way with local stone paved paths and a botanical garden laid out in its early stages.  The paths wind around up and down taking you past many indigenous bushes trees and shrubs, some have been newly planted and others have been here for many years: carob, terebinth, laurel, oleander, thyme and of course olive are just a few. The scent of the air is so good that I wished I could bottle it. There are also very tall eucalyptus trees which

must add to this heady, fragrant aroma. The Eucalyptus is not indigenous however, as it was introduced during the British rule to try to counteract the swampy areas and so reduce the mosquito population.

As I made my way down the steps to this shady, cool and tranquil grotto I heard the water trickling down into the pool. The area is completely secluded with olive, fig, eucalyptus and numerous other bushes and trees growing all around and above . The crystal clear  water in the pool is very cool I stood my foot in one of the gullies flowing from the pool and felt the tingling effects of this refreshing coolness for quite some time afterwards. Nowadays people are requested not to swim or paddle in the pool but when I first visited this was the norm. Health and safety is everywhere these days. There is close at hand however, a small rivulet running down a rock into a natural stone basin, where you can wash your hands and cool your face. From here there is the start of a nature trail that will take you on the Akamas.

Wandering back up the steps I came across a magnificent gecko who scurried away into the undergrowth before I could snap it but the young one remained quite still for some moments allowing me a shot.

I made my way around onto a high area with spectacular views over the coast and lingered for a while at this peaceful spot before making my way back as dusk was beginning to fall. Farewell until next time.

What I love about Cyprus…..

What I love about Cyprus are the smells: the earth has its own aroma and there are so many fragrant bushes and trees and flowers. The sun intensifies the essential oils and makes these more potent, then after it rains again the scent is heady in the air. Close to where I am there are many pine trees and these smell beautifully fresh and delicate.

Then there are the smells of cooking….cinnamon, souvlakia cooking, bread and all manner of familiar spices and herbs mixed with vegetables and meat wafts in the air.

I love the sheep and the goats and the flavourful cheese: halloumi , anari, that is made with their milk. I love the views from the heights on the Akamas looking down over the rough terrain down to the blue sea that disappears into the horizon, the individual landscape that is Cyprus. There is a wildness here that will never be tamed and this I love.

I get very disappointed when I see so much commercialism near the coast to entice the tourist usually with cheap tat, tavernas, hotels and villas thrown up overnight in the hope they will be filled by visitors, offering them what they think they want. There is so much more Cyprus has to offer it just needs a little effort to find it.

I love the old buildings often in a half state of collapse or in some cases beautifully restored and even some newly built houses would make me see the advantages of these.

I love driving round the bends in the roads never knowing what I will find around the corner, what new vista lies before me and  the radio playing my favourite Greek music with the breeze cooling my face.

I love the fresh fruit, nectarines,watermelon, grapes, figs whatever you want you can find it growing here fresh and delicious with some sheep yoghurt in the morning.

The best time for me is late September  or early May when the temperature is warm but not so stifelingly hot as to render you a melted heap.

Last but not least I love the donkeys, how I miss seeing you doing your daily work up the hills.